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HBO Go To Be Available in 2015 Without Cable Subscription


Nashley Tisdale

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http://www.theverge.com/2014/10/15/6982049/hbo-go-will-offer-standalone-subscription-2015

 

Starting next year, you'll finally be able to watch HBO on the web without a cable subscription. In a dream come true for cord cutters, HBO CEO Richard Plepler has confirmed the company plans to launch a "standalone, over-the-top" HBO Go subscription offering at some point in 2015. This service will be offered in the United States and there are also plans to bring it overseas. "This will be transformative for our company," Plepler said. He didn't delve into specifics or outline whether there will be differences in what's made available to cable customers and internet subscribers. Plepler only said that HBO will "work with current partners and explore models with new partners."

 

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But the message couldn't be more clear: in 2015, you'll have the option to ditch cable and keep watching HBO's hit shows.

 

PRAISE THE LORD! This is pretty huge.

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Yeah, I mean I figured that was implied.

 

Sorry, I meant pay a premium. It's not going to be $9.99, IMO. It'll be tiered, I'd think, but I'm guessing if you want full access, it's going to be something like $29.99 plus taxes and fees.

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Sorry, I meant pay a premium. It's not going to be $9.99, IMO. It'll be tiered, I'd think, but I'm guessing if you want full access, it's going to be something like $29.99 plus taxes and fees.

 

So you think it'll be more expensive than when it's bundled with a cable package? For instance, HBO on Fios right now, it's ~$10/month for the first year, $20/month for the second year, so around $15.00/month on average. But that's for a full HBO package of like 10 channels, plus on demand, plus HBO-GO.

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So you think it'll be more expensive than when it's bundled with a cable package? For instance, HBO on Fios right now, it's ~$10/month for the first year, $20/month for the second year, so around $15.00/month on average. But that's for a full HBO package of like 10 channels, plus on demand, plus HBO-GO.

 

Yes, because they are doing this for a reason, and that reason being they are hedging bets that you'd rather give them $30 than Verizon or Cablevision $200.

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Yes, because they are doing this for a reason, and that reason being they are hedging bets that you'd rather give them $30 than Verizon or Cablevision $200.

 

Maybe. But if they're chasing after the younger generation that's moving away from big-box cable, they might have to rethink that strategy. Since online, it's all about moving data, they might decide to go with a sort of pay as you use sort of subscription. IE, $X for Y hours of streaming per month.

 

If they go $30/month and a user is already paying $50 for broadband access, $20 for Netflix and $20/month or so for an online sports package, it's getting up there. Now you're talking about paying $120/month for significantly less programming. $200/month at Cablevision is getting you pretty much every channel.

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I don't think people will cancel their cable with this. You are still gonna have to pay Verizon/Cable Provider more money for internet if you cancel your TV with them. Internet alone is pretty expensive from these companies, and they could raise Internet only prices to make up for it.
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Maybe. But if they're chasing after the younger generation that's moving away from big-box cable, they might have to rethink that strategy. Since online, it's all about moving data, they might decide to go with a sort of pay as you use sort of subscription. IE, $X for Y hours of streaming per month.

 

If they go $30/month and a user is already paying $50 for broadband access, $20 for Netflix and $20/month or so for an online sports package, it's getting up there. Now you're talking about paying $120/month for significantly less programming. $200/month at Cablevision is getting you pretty much every channel.

That's what I mean about tiered. You might be able to subscribe to certain shows, but full access to everything in their library won't be cheap. And as far as bandwidth goes, I'd bet you they'd go in with a "net-neutrality" model that says you pay more, you get less "buffering".

 

I don't think people will cancel their cable with this. You are still gonna have to pay Verizon/Cable Provider more money for internet if you cancel your TV with them. Internet alone is pretty expensive from these companies, and they could raise Internet only prices to make up for it.

Cheaper, alternate ISPs will pop up.

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CBS getting into the act now

http://deadline.com/2014/10/cbs-launches-subscription-streaming-service-852895/

 

Here you go, cord-cutters — and take that, Hulu: It’s called CBS All Access, and it will offer streams of broadcasts from the 14 stations that the network owns, as well as VOD for “thousands of episodes from the current season, previous seasons and classic shows,” the company says. It’s available today at CBS.com as well as iOS and Android apps for mobile devices.
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If we end up with an a la carte system where you pay for what channels you want, can subscribe by the day, week, month or year, plus have specialty "networks" like Netflix and Hulu for group packaging if you want it, the consumer wins. Cable enjoyed their monopoly status long enough. Even when Satellite and fiber players got in the mix, their essential price fixing and promotional fish hook systems kept prices ridiculously high while service and support were often terrible. And you were forced to pay for hundreds of channels you don't watch and have to wade through just to have the handful of channels you actually wanted.

 

These may very well be the few first steps in a revolutionary change to mainstream media access. And it's about freaking time, considering we still don't have flying cars or automatic food preparers.

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I mean they still win though as they control the means of data transfer, which they already charge quite a bit for. And once they lose control of cable packages, I would expect those charges to increase. It's why all of these cable companies are trying to kill net neutrality.

 

Right, but Google is already starting to wire the country while competing with cable companies that bundle internet with content. If that bundle goes away, then Google will have that much more incentive to compete as an ISP. And that will force Cable/Fios to lower prices to stay in the game.

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Right, but Google is already starting to wire the country while competing with cable companies that bundle internet with content. If that bundle goes away, then Google will have that much more incentive to compete as an ISP. And that will force Cable/Fios to lower prices to stay in the game.

 

I'm not sure what you're getting at. The only thing Fiber offers is insane speed (1 Gbps) at a competitive price. Otherwise, $70/month gets you internet alone and $120/month gets you internet and TV (with one cable box). The internet price is competitive and the cable/TV bundle is only slightly competitive with other cable companies.

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