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Thread: The Trump Administration's Handling of the Coronavirus

  1. #1221
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    I think pretty much every store should start opening up with reasonable guidelines. No reason for Stop and Shop to be packed with customers and be open 24/7 and Nordstrom going bankrupt because they're not allowed to operate

  2. #1222
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    Once again, i believe this is regional. What works in Hawaii right now might be a different phase from NYC


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  3. #1223
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albatross View Post
    I think pretty much every store should start opening up with reasonable guidelines. No reason for Stop and Shop to be packed with customers and be open 24/7 and Nordstrom going bankrupt because they're not allowed to operate
    Opening if they want to - sure. The reasonable guidelines should be mandatory guidelines to allowing the opening IMO. Where is OSHA and CDC? They were pretty effective at mandating sensible regulations in my business (years ago) that we had to comply with or we would be shut down and/or fined. With this widespread health crisis for the entire community (not just one business location) one would think they would use their lawful and rightful powers to protect all concerned.

  4. #1224
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4EverRangerFrank View Post
    Opening if they want to - sure. The reasonable guidelines should be mandatory guidelines to allowing the opening IMO. Where is OSHA and CDC? They were pretty effective at mandating sensible regulations in my business (years ago) that we had to comply with or we would be shut down and/or fined. With this widespread health crisis for the entire community (not just one business location) one would think they would use their lawful and rightful powers to protect all concerned.
    I have concerns that it come from the Federal level...as Puck Head pointed out. I prefer guidlines to mandatory orders from such a high level.
    In 1994 I thought I could die in peace...now I'm hungry again.

  5. #1225
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    Well worth the watch.

    Last edited by Pete; 06-01-2020 at 06:48 AM.

  6. #1226
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    Unrest Poses Fresh Test for Trump, Who Has Been Both Sympathetic And Combative
    Advisers have pushed him to dial down the heat of some of his commentary

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/unrest-...ve-11591014098

    WASHINGTON—President Trump on Wednesday watched video footage of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis police custody on Air Force One en route to Florida. He later tweeted that he had ordered an investigation and that “my heart goes out to George’s family and friends. Justice will be served!”

    In the days since, as cities around the nation have erupted in violence, the president has continued to express sympathy for Mr. Floyd’s family. But Mr. Trump has also eschewed the traditional role of a president in calling for unity and calm. Instead, he has repeatedly offered a combative response to the unrest, tweeting at protesters that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” and calling on cities to get tougher.

    Some of Mr. Trump’s commentary prompted a call from advisers to lower the ”temperature” of his pronouncements amid a moment of national crisis, according to a senior White House official. The president sounded more conciliatory words Saturday from the SpaceX launch in Florida, saying he understood that people were in pain.

    As protests continued Sunday, aides were deliberating on next steps, with Mr. Trump staying out of public view. Despite interest among some advisers in a formal address to the nation, the president would prefer to wait and speak again when he can announce new policy proposals, potentially related to law enforcement measures, the official said.

    “It’s very important to the president that any engagement be backed by policy deliverables,” said the White House official, adding that racial strife was a systemic issue that has plagued previous presidents.

    The widespread unrest sparked by Mr. Floyd’s death presents Mr. Trump with a fresh test in an already challenging year, forcing him to contend with racial divisions while simultaneously pushing the country to reopen from the pandemic shutdown. The impact of the chaos was clear Saturday, as it largely overshadowed the launch, the first to blast human beings into space from a U.S. location in nine years, a moment Mr. Trump hoped would highlight American ingenuity.

    During a speech in Florida after liftoff, Mr. Trump said he understands “the pain that people are feeling” after Mr. Floyd’s death, while still emphasizing his support for law enforcement and condemning violent protesters.

    “We support the right of peaceful protesters, and we hear their pleas,” he said. “But what we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with justice or with peace.”

    Part of Mr. Trump’s campaign message in 2016 was that he would take a tough approach to law and order and would support local police in street confrontations. On Sunday, he said the administration would designate Antifa, a loosely organized radical left group that he has blamed for the Minneapolis unrest, as a terrorist organization.

    Mr. Trump’s Monday schedule included a video teleconference with governors, law enforcement, and national security officials “on keeping American communities safe.”

    The president was widely perceived to have fumbled the government’s response to another high-profile moment of racial strife earlier in his term when he suggested that both sides were to blame during clashes three years ago in Charlottesville, Va., between white nationalist protesters holding a demonstration and the counterprotesters facing off against them.

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) criticized the president Sunday for not doing more to address the nation’s emotions in the wake of Mr. Floyd’s death, saying on ABC that past presidents have “seen their responsibility to be the president of the United States, to unify our country and not to fuel the flame.”

    Some Republicans see peril for the president in the unrest six months before the general election, with many polls suggesting he is trailing presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

    The former vice president visited a protest site in Wilmington, Del., Sunday. He tweeted a photo of himself, wearing a mask and kneeling to speak with a protester, adding: “We are a nation in pain right now, but we must not allow this pain to destroy us.”

    “It’s truly hard to see a path to victory for Trump that runs through the twin realities of a depressed economy and escalating riots,” said Republican donor Dan Eberhart.

    The chaos also further strains Mr. Trump’s effort to appeal to black voters in November. He had been hoping to improve his numbers with African-Americans, given the booming economy earlier this year and a series of policy wins, such as criminal justice reform that has seen thousands of federal inmates released who had been incarcerated for nonviolent offenses.

    But that pitch had already grown harder as unemployment has spiked and the coronavirus pandemic has disproportionately affected African-Americans.

    Trump 2020 campaign spokeswoman Katrina Pierson said the president is “speaking out for the people who are losing their businesses and their life’s work to the riots, often in minority communities, in the face of liberals who make excuses for the extreme elements, like Antifa, who are using the riots as cover for their anarchist agenda.”

    Those close to the president say he has been closely following the unfolding events, monitoring television reports and getting briefings from law enforcement. His White House has also been affected by the protests, with the Secret Service moving Mr. Trump to an underground bunker for a time Friday night due to the protests, according to another senior administration official. On Sunday, White House management advised staffers to avoid the complex due to the demonstrations.

    In the early hours of Friday, Mr. Trump bemoaned the chaos in Minneapolis, criticized the protesters and appeared to issue a warning, saying: “Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!”

    The comment echoed a similar phrase used in 1967 by a police chief in Miami, where race riots later broke out. Mr. Trump later said he didn’t mean to suggest that protesters would be dealt with violently and said he didn’t know the background of the expression.

    A day later, after a violent night outside the White House, Mr. Trump declared that any protesters breaching the fence would “have been greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen.”

    After the Friday and Saturday tweets, advisers pushed Mr. Trump to tone down his rhetoric during a tense time for the country, the White House official said. He also heard from Sen. Tim Scott, (R., S.C.) who has worked closely with the administration on policy issues affecting the black community and who connected with Mr. Trump at the suggestion of the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner.

    Mr. Scott said those tweets were “not helpful” at this moment. He said he encouraged Mr. Trump to focus on the tragedy of Mr. Floyd’s death and said the president listened and was receptive.

    “The rest of the day I think he had some positive tweets and I think he was good in the afternoon in NASA,” Mr. Scott said in an interview.

    Mr. Scott said he pushed for the president to meet with African-American leaders to discuss issues of race. He also recommended the creation of a commission on race and justice.

    “He wants to get to a place that leads to more progress,” said Mr. Scott. “I think that the key is to help him understand a different perspective.”

  7. #1227
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4EverRangerFrank View Post
    Unrest Poses Fresh Test for Trump, Who Has Been Both Sympathetic And Combative
    Advisers have pushed him to dial down the heat of some of his commentary

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/unrest-...ve-11591014098

    WASHINGTON—President Trump on Wednesday watched video footage of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis police custody on Air Force One en route to Florida. He later tweeted that he had ordered an investigation and that “my heart goes out to George’s family and friends. Justice will be served!”

    In the days since, as cities around the nation have erupted in violence, the president has continued to express sympathy for Mr. Floyd’s family. But Mr. Trump has also eschewed the traditional role of a president in calling for unity and calm. Instead, he has repeatedly offered a combative response to the unrest, tweeting at protesters that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” and calling on cities to get tougher.

    Some of Mr. Trump’s commentary prompted a call from advisers to lower the ”temperature” of his pronouncements amid a moment of national crisis, according to a senior White House official. The president sounded more conciliatory words Saturday from the SpaceX launch in Florida, saying he understood that people were in pain.

    As protests continued Sunday, aides were deliberating on next steps, with Mr. Trump staying out of public view. Despite interest among some advisers in a formal address to the nation, the president would prefer to wait and speak again when he can announce new policy proposals, potentially related to law enforcement measures, the official said.

    “It’s very important to the president that any engagement be backed by policy deliverables,” said the White House official, adding that racial strife was a systemic issue that has plagued previous presidents.

    The widespread unrest sparked by Mr. Floyd’s death presents Mr. Trump with a fresh test in an already challenging year, forcing him to contend with racial divisions while simultaneously pushing the country to reopen from the pandemic shutdown. The impact of the chaos was clear Saturday, as it largely overshadowed the launch, the first to blast human beings into space from a U.S. location in nine years, a moment Mr. Trump hoped would highlight American ingenuity.

    During a speech in Florida after liftoff, Mr. Trump said he understands “the pain that people are feeling” after Mr. Floyd’s death, while still emphasizing his support for law enforcement and condemning violent protesters.

    “We support the right of peaceful protesters, and we hear their pleas,” he said. “But what we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with justice or with peace.”

    Part of Mr. Trump’s campaign message in 2016 was that he would take a tough approach to law and order and would support local police in street confrontations. On Sunday, he said the administration would designate Antifa, a loosely organized radical left group that he has blamed for the Minneapolis unrest, as a terrorist organization.

    Mr. Trump’s Monday schedule included a video teleconference with governors, law enforcement, and national security officials “on keeping American communities safe.”

    The president was widely perceived to have fumbled the government’s response to another high-profile moment of racial strife earlier in his term when he suggested that both sides were to blame during clashes three years ago in Charlottesville, Va., between white nationalist protesters holding a demonstration and the counterprotesters facing off against them.

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) criticized the president Sunday for not doing more to address the nation’s emotions in the wake of Mr. Floyd’s death, saying on ABC that past presidents have “seen their responsibility to be the president of the United States, to unify our country and not to fuel the flame.”

    Some Republicans see peril for the president in the unrest six months before the general election, with many polls suggesting he is trailing presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

    The former vice president visited a protest site in Wilmington, Del., Sunday. He tweeted a photo of himself, wearing a mask and kneeling to speak with a protester, adding: “We are a nation in pain right now, but we must not allow this pain to destroy us.”

    “It’s truly hard to see a path to victory for Trump that runs through the twin realities of a depressed economy and escalating riots,” said Republican donor Dan Eberhart.

    The chaos also further strains Mr. Trump’s effort to appeal to black voters in November. He had been hoping to improve his numbers with African-Americans, given the booming economy earlier this year and a series of policy wins, such as criminal justice reform that has seen thousands of federal inmates released who had been incarcerated for nonviolent offenses.

    But that pitch had already grown harder as unemployment has spiked and the coronavirus pandemic has disproportionately affected African-Americans.

    Trump 2020 campaign spokeswoman Katrina Pierson said the president is “speaking out for the people who are losing their businesses and their life’s work to the riots, often in minority communities, in the face of liberals who make excuses for the extreme elements, like Antifa, who are using the riots as cover for their anarchist agenda.”

    Those close to the president say he has been closely following the unfolding events, monitoring television reports and getting briefings from law enforcement. His White House has also been affected by the protests, with the Secret Service moving Mr. Trump to an underground bunker for a time Friday night due to the protests, according to another senior administration official. On Sunday, White House management advised staffers to avoid the complex due to the demonstrations.

    In the early hours of Friday, Mr. Trump bemoaned the chaos in Minneapolis, criticized the protesters and appeared to issue a warning, saying: “Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!”

    The comment echoed a similar phrase used in 1967 by a police chief in Miami, where race riots later broke out. Mr. Trump later said he didn’t mean to suggest that protesters would be dealt with violently and said he didn’t know the background of the expression.

    A day later, after a violent night outside the White House, Mr. Trump declared that any protesters breaching the fence would “have been greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen.”

    After the Friday and Saturday tweets, advisers pushed Mr. Trump to tone down his rhetoric during a tense time for the country, the White House official said. He also heard from Sen. Tim Scott, (R., S.C.) who has worked closely with the administration on policy issues affecting the black community and who connected with Mr. Trump at the suggestion of the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner.

    Mr. Scott said those tweets were “not helpful” at this moment. He said he encouraged Mr. Trump to focus on the tragedy of Mr. Floyd’s death and said the president listened and was receptive.

    “The rest of the day I think he had some positive tweets and I think he was good in the afternoon in NASA,” Mr. Scott said in an interview.

    Mr. Scott said he pushed for the president to meet with African-American leaders to discuss issues of race. He also recommended the creation of a commission on race and justice.

    “He wants to get to a place that leads to more progress,” said Mr. Scott. “I think that the key is to help him understand a different perspective.”
    The TL;DR here is "Trump is tone deaf, ignorant of history, enjoys the carnage, and wants to blame liberals for everything he can't manipulate."

    Hopefully we can end this national nightmare in five months time.
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