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Thread: Cost of Living and Taxes

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    All the quick searches I've done on why that waiver even exists all show it's tax deductible.

    Still no clear answer on why it's there, tho.
    My accountant said otherwise. I believe it ties into the loss of SALT deductions from our illustrious president.

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niko View Post
    My accountant said otherwise. I believe it ties into the loss of SALT deductions from our illustrious president.
    Send this to your accountant and ask. They may be able to file an amended return.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/ttlc.in.../00/591544/amp

    It's not a state or local tax, it can be considered a "fee".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Niko View Post
    Yes, lol. Thatís the issue.

    I pay NYS, nyc (although I donít live in nyc), Nassau county residents tax, Nassau county property tax, Medicare, fica, social security (where Iíll never see the benefit of my social security because of my pension), etc.

    I pay multiple taxes that I get no benefit from. Itís why the idea of more taxes infuriates me.
    Medicare, FICA, social security, are all taxes we all pay. Youíd be going them no matter what.

    Property taxes Iím assuming are from the area you live in, so thatís typical.

    Question, you only pay income taxes in one area correct? If so, thatís normal once again.

    So looks like the residency tax is hitting you from a area you donít live in?


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  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puck Head View Post
    Medicare, FICA, social security, are all taxes we all pay. You’d be going them no matter what.

    Property taxes I’m assuming are from the area you live in, so that’s typical.

    Question, you only pay income taxes in one area correct? If so, that’s normal once again.

    So looks like the residency tax is hitting you from a area you don’t live in?


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    I pay into social security, but I have a social security offset from my pension, which will lessen my pension after forcing me to withdraw at 62. That’s my issue.

    And again, I don’t live in nyc, I work there. Yet, thru an 1127 waiver, I’m paying the full tax rate for nyc despite note living there, being unable to vote there and getting none of the benefits of a nyc resident, like universal pre-k. I then pay a residence tax for nassau county and then $15k in property taxes in Nassau county as well. The $6k I pay to nyc, where I don’t live and have no rights, it’s what bothers me.

    I don’t know why you assume I’m a moron and that i’m complaining about taxes that everyone in the US pays, lol. I think I’ve been abundantly clear about it, if you look earlier in the thread.
    Last edited by Niko; 11-30-2019 at 05:26 PM.

  5. #125
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    Cost of Living and Taxes

    Anytime you work in a location you donít live in, you pay those local income taxes yet have no benefits.

    Same goes with the opposite. Example: Around 10k of our employees work in Alaska, but live in states with a income tax.
    Since we donít have income taxes up here, they have to pay where they live.

    You pay into social security, and you get it back at age 62 or whatever like the rest of us. Any issues you have are with your contract, not taxes.


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  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puck Head View Post
    Anytime you work in a location you don’t live in, you pay those local income taxes yet have no benefits.

    Same goes with the opposite. Example: Around 10k of our employees work in Alaska, but live in states with a income tax.
    Since we don’t have income taxes up here, they have to pay where they live.

    You pay into social security, and you get it back at age 62 or whatever like the rest of us. Any issues you have are with your contract, not taxes.


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    That’s not true. I’m not talking about NYS tax. That, I’d pay regardless. I’m talking about nyc tax. NYC has its own income tax, but you don’t pay it if you’re not a resident. Chris stated that his wife is employed by the City but doesn’t pay it. My wife works in the private sector (in an office in NYC) and doesn’t pay it. But nyc cops and firemen that don’t live in the city of New York are still on the hook for it.

    http://www.jamesdance.com/nonresidency.htm
    “As a resident, you pay state and city tax on all your income. As a non-resident, you only pay tax on New York source income, which includes earnings from work physically performed in New York State, and income from real property. You are not liable for city tax.”

  7. #127
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    I see, that clarifies some.
    Typically this is called a commuter ďtaxĒ. For those that work in a borough/city/etc that donít live there.

    Essentially to offset the usage of emergency services and road usage.


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  8. #128
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    In the 2019 NYC local income tax code.

    Salary- 65k
    Single- 3.7k
    Married- 3.4k
    Head of household- 3.5k

    I believe once the 1127 is filed, you should be able to deduct those withholdings against your federal tax return?


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  9. #129
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    to be honest,my taxes hasnt been raised since trump took over,my taxes went up a third from 2008 to about 2016,i bought my house in 2007,new.

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puck Head View Post
    Anytime you work in a location you donít live in, you pay those local income taxes yet have no benefits.

    Same goes with the opposite. Example: Around 10k of our employees work in Alaska, but live in states with a income tax.
    Since we donít have income taxes up here, they have to pay where they live.

    You pay into social security, and you get it back at age 62 or whatever like the rest of us. Any issues you have are with your contract, not taxes.


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    This,
    Last edited by Pete; 12-01-2019 at 02:27 PM.

  11. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puck Head View Post
    Any issues you have are with your contract, not taxes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    This,
    I understand why this is brought up, but that's not how it works in reality.

    First, people don't get into public safety to get rich. While individual reasons surely vary, the overarching theme is to help people. These are people that feel the urge to act when action is needed. People that run towards danger to see how they can help instead of fleeing to save themselves. I'd say most people commit to a career in public safety for that. They put up with the danger and the verbal/psychological/physical/emotional abuse and trauma for the chance to make a positive impact on someone's life. That's why the stick around. That's why they don't just go find a new job. There is nothing wrong with people in public safety campaigning for more money and better benefits. They deserve it.

    That leads into the second point. You don't negotiate a contract. You can't walk into your boss' office and demand a raise. You don't go on strike. You have to campaign to politicians that generally don't understand what you do and what you have to deal with.

    There are shitloads of vacancies in departments all across the country. An unfortunate side effect creating good private sector jobs. Its stuff like this tax thing that pushes people over the edge and forces them to change their career to be able to support their family.

    I'd be curious to see how many people are working under this waiver and how much money it generates for the city. My guess would be the city of 8.6 million people wouldn't even know it was gone, but the families of those paying it would greatly benefit.

  12. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Long live the King View Post
    I understand why this is brought up, but that's not how it works in reality.

    First, people don't get into public safety to get rich. While individual reasons surely vary, the overarching theme is to help people. These are people that feel the urge to act when action is needed. People that run towards danger to see how they can help instead of fleeing to save themselves. I'd say most people commit to a career in public safety for that. They put up with the danger and the verbal/psychological/physical/emotional abuse and trauma for the chance to make a positive impact on someone's life. That's why the stick around. That's why they don't just go find a new job. There is nothing wrong with people in public safety campaigning for more money and better benefits. They deserve it.

    That leads into the second point. You don't negotiate a contract. You can't walk into your boss' office and demand a raise. You don't go on strike. You have to campaign to politicians that generally don't understand what you do and what you have to deal with.

    There are shitloads of vacancies in departments all across the country. An unfortunate side effect creating good private sector jobs. Its stuff like this tax thing that pushes people over the edge and forces them to change their career to be able to support their family.

    I'd be curious to see how many people are working under this waiver and how much money it generates for the city. My guess would be the city of 8.6 million people wouldn't even know it was gone, but the families of those paying it would greatly benefit.
    Frankly, you have more faith in people than I do.

    The point about the contract is, when you enter into an employment agreement with the city, you know going in that you'll have to pay the waiver if you don't live in the city. So if you choose to sign it, and then choose not to live in the city...Isn't that all really on you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    Frankly, you have more faith in people than I do.

    The point about the contract is, when you enter into an employment agreement with the city, you know going in that you'll have to pay the waiver if you don't live in the city. So if you choose to sign it, and then choose not to live in the city...Isn't that all really on you?
    Yea it is 'on him'. Yet he still goes to work everyday to help complete strangers. Does that mean he can't have an opinion about it? Can't lobby to get it changed?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    This,
    I was a city resident when I was hired. I had no knowledge of this until I bought a house outside of the city and saw the 1127 deduction being taken from my paycheck.

    Also, the social security offset wasn’t always there. It was part of the pension tier change that occurred when Patterson didn’t extend the tier two. I took a test and was then applying for the old pension system, which was changed as I was processing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    This,
    I was a city resident when I was hired. I had no knowledge of this until I bought a house outside of the city and saw the 1127 deduction being taken from my paycheck.

    Also, the social security offset wasnít always there. It was part of the pension tier change that occurred when Patterson didnít extend the tier two. I took a test and was then applying for the old pension system, which was changed as I was processing.

  16. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Long live the King View Post
    Yea it is 'on him'. Yet he still goes to work everyday to help complete strangers. Does that mean he can't have an opinion about it? Can't lobby to get it changed?
    You can have an opinion. You can voice it on a forum. And you can get a reply saying "that's not a tax, it's your contract". One you pay willingly and one you don't. This thread is about taxes...It's a matter of fact, not a judgement on the state of NYPD contracts.

    Oh, and also he might get a little advice like "it might be tax deductible, ask your accountant again".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Puck Head View Post
    Anytime you work in a location you don’t live in, you pay those local income taxes yet have no benefits.

    Same goes with the opposite. Example: Around 10k of our employees work in Alaska, but live in states with a income tax.
    Since we don’t have income taxes up here, they have to pay where they live.

    You pay into social security, and you get it back at age 62 or whatever like the rest of us. Any issues you have are with your contract, not taxes.


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    Its not a contract issue, they have been fighting it for years. There used to be a city tax one everyone, I remember my dad having to pay it, and then it was dropped. Now, the only ones paying it are cops and firemen, no other city employees pay it. You do get some of it back, but its still taxing without representation. I can't vote for the mayor who negotiates my contract with my union.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Puck Head View Post
    I see, that clarifies some.
    Typically this is called a commuter “tax”. For those that work in a borough/city/etc that don’t live there.

    Essentially to offset the usage of emergency services and road usage.


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    They have tolls on everything that pay for road usage, and they use toll money more for the transit system, which makes zero sense.

  19. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYR2711 View Post
    Its not a contract issue, they have been fighting it for years. There used to be a city tax one everyone, I remember my dad having to pay it, and then it was dropped. Now, the only ones paying it are cops and firemen, no other city employees pay it. You do get some of it back, but its still taxing without representation. I can't vote for the mayor who negotiates my contract with my union.
    It's not a tax, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYR2711 View Post
    Its not a contract issue, they have been fighting it for years. There used to be a city tax one everyone, I remember my dad having to pay it, and then it was dropped. Now, the only ones paying it are cops and firemen, no other city employees pay it. You do get some of it back, but its still taxing without representation. I can't vote for the mayor who negotiates my contract with my union.
    I read everyone who lives outside the city yet works there pays it.
    Is this true.

    In fact, read the only ones not paying is the department of education


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